– The Power of Thoughts and Emotions

The thoughts we think and the emotions we feel have a direct effect on our strength, energy, and ability to move efficiently (or not).

It is true that negative thoughts and feelings (anger, sadness, negativity, etc.) cause us to lose strength and move less efficiently. Positive thoughts give us strength and help us to move better.

The following assessment is something we demonstrate at all live workshops. The results are quite amazing.

I learned this technique from Dr. Perry Nickelston at a workshop in Denver many years ago. I was the test patient and could not believe what happened.

(I’m sorry this video isn’t great quality. I will replace t soon)

Testers: Try this (and be sure your patient is not having shoulder issues prior to administering)

• Without explaining the power of thoughts and emotions, share with your client that you want to do an experiment with them
• Ask your client to think of something (a past experience) or someone who when they think of, causes them to engage in intense feelings of sadness or anger
• It often helps if the client closes their eyes and have complete silence while getting into a state of sadness or negativity
• Tell your client to take their time and when they are fully engaged in the negative state of emotion, put their arms out to the sides – elbows locked and arms parallel to the floor
• Next, cue your client that on the count of three, you will place your hands on their upper forearms near the elbows and push their arms down – however, their job is to use every bit of strength to resist pushing down the arms.
• Count to three, push down, and make a mental note of how difficult or easy it was to break them and push the arms down
• Next – instruct your client to forget about those negative thoughts. Now, it is time to get happy and think positive. This may take a minute or two or more.
• Cue your client to think of something or someone who when they think of, causes them to feel happiness, joy, love, excitement, and positivity
• Instruct the client to put their arms out to the sides when they are fully engaged in this positive state
• Cue your client that on the count of three, you will place your hands on their upper forearms near the elbows and push their arms down – however, their job is to use every bit of strength to resist pushing down the arms.
• Count to three, push down, and make a mental note of how difficult or easy it was to break them and push the arms down

Did you notice a difference in their level of resistance between negative and positive states? You likely noticed quite an increase in strength when they engaged in feelings of love and positivity.

What the trainer notices is especially important, but what the client notices is MORE important. Did your client feel stronger while engaged in positive thoughts and emotions?

My guess is that they did. This will be the case almost all the time.

Our team of instructors has used this test on hundreds of people. Only twice have we noticed no difference in strength while the client is engaged in positive thoughts and emotions.

My story about an experience of this type:

It was July of 2016. I was climbing the Manitou Incline with my good friend, Jordan – near Colorado Springs. I had climbed this incline 6 times previously. It is a very humbling workout.

On this beautiful July day and my seventh trip climbing Manitou, I found myself struggling a lot. I was feeling weak and moving slower than ever (I always timed how long it took me to reach the top – on every climb). In addition, I was angry and complaining a lot to Jordan about a person who really pissed me off. I felt violated and used and I was seething!

Now, the day before our climb, Jordan had been with me at the workshop where Dr. Perry demonstrated the emotion test of strength on me.

About halfway up the incline, she stopped me and said, “dude, don’t you remember what Dr. Perry did with you yesterday? You are engaged in anger and you are moving so slow. You are slow because of your anger. You need to snap out of it!” While this took me by surprise, I realized that she was right!

I felt sort of embarrassed that I was so angry. Anyone who knows me KNOWS that I RARELY get angry. It hardly ever happens, and it takes a LOT for me to feel angry.

Well, after about ten minutes of thinking and talking and readjusting my thoughts and attitude, I realized that the person I was angry with had NO IDEA I was angry with them. Hell, I was giving this person power she did not even know she had. THAT seemed completely ridiculous.

I decided right then and there that she did not deserve this power over me, and I would deal with the situation later that day and either work it out or discontinue my professional affiliation with her.

Upon making that decision, I felt empowered, optimistic, in control of my emotions and felt all kinds of positivity.

We started climbing again and I nearly FLEW up the second half of that incline. I could hardly believe how much better I was moving.

Later that day, I called the person I was upset with and we talked. Ever since then, we have been great friends and have a great working relationship.

The power of emotions and thoughts is real. They can make you or break you. Yes – it is often easier said than done to engage in positive thoughts. However, it is important to assess our negative thoughts and determine if they are worthy of having. It is a process to learn how to control your thoughts, but we are humans. We have amazing capabilities, including the power of free will and the power to choose our thoughts, should we decide to exercise this control.

Again, your thoughts can make you and they can break you.

With depression statistically being the number one non-motor symptom in the Parkinson’s population, this test showing the power of positive and negative thoughts can be very beneficial in creating awareness of the power of thought and help the client to be stronger and move better.